Category: Uncategorized

Soil Problems in New Neighbourhoods

Posted by shane - March 3, 2017 - Uncategorized

Soil is probably the most overlooked part of the landscaping process, and likely results in the majority of plant death, or at least lack of vigour.  In my 1950’s neighbourhood I was lucky to inherit about 24” of good black dirt in both my front and back yard.  There isn’t a Prairie hardy plant I […]

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Weigela

Posted by shane - January 14, 2017 - Uncategorized

Weigela florida Weigela is a beautiful plant with showy, attractive blooms in pinks, reds, purples, and white.  I would consider it marginally hardy in central Alberta, and it is uncommon in the landscape.  On the rare occasion when I do see a specimen in a client’s yard, it usually looks pretty dismal. I plan to […]

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Serviceberry

Posted by shane - January 13, 2017 - Uncategorized

Amelanchier ‘Autumn Brilliance’ Amelanchier ‘Robin Hill’ I really like serviceberry, because it’s basically just a single-stem, saskatoon tree.  Unfortunately, I don’t think it is 100% right for our region, even though it technically is hardy and gets through the winter.  It basically just sits there all season, flowers well, leafs out, barely grows (maybe 1″ […]

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Sea Buckthorn

Posted by shane - January 11, 2017 - Uncategorized

Hippophae rhamnoides & cvs. Sea buckthorn is a very common and well-respected plant in the eastern part of the world, where it’s used to produce around 200 different products.  The berries are high in Vitamin C and other nutrients.  In the West, it is largely unknown, except to horticulturists, a few specialty berry growers, and […]

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Wolf Willow

Posted by shane - February 1, 2016 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Shrubs, Uncategorized

Eleagnus commutata Native to Alberta, wolf willow is a common site in natural areas such as streambanks, dry slopes, and open fields.  It is aggressive and often invasive, and I would not recommend planting this shrub in an ornamental setting.  It looks best in its native environment, on acreages, and in large, park-like settings.  It […]

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Is My Pine or Spruce Tree OK?

Posted by shane - October 3, 2010 - Uncategorized

Starting in late summer, many homeowners begin to see the interior needles of their pines, spruces, and cedars turning yellow or orange.  This is normal.  Needles only live for a few years (depending on species) and then die back during fall.  It is common for people to think that something is wrong with their trees. […]

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