Archive: January, 2015

Ninebark

Posted by shane - January 8, 2015 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Shrubs

Physocarpus opulifolius This is probably among the top five commonly planted shrubs in Alberta.  A healthy ninebark makes a nice accent in a shrub bed, and different cultivars offer a variety of foliage colours, from amber to purple to greenish-gold.  One of the nicest formal hedges I have seen was a hand-sheared golden ninebark hedge.  I […]

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Manitoba Maple

Posted by shane - January 8, 2015 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Trees

Acer negundo Acer negundo ‘Sensation’ People seem to love or hate this tree.  Personally, I like it.  It’s a nice, medium- to large shade tree, often with an interesting twisted trunk and unusual structure.  Older specimens fit well in a creative garden.  The nice thing about Manitoba maple, aka. Boxelder, is that it grow so […]

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Silver Maple

Posted by shane - January 8, 2015 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Trees

Acer saccharinum cvs. This is one of my favourite shade trees in recent years.  Silver maple has very attractive silvery-green foliage and a light grey bark.  It grows quickly in the right location, and is once formative pruning is complete, is relatively low-maintenance.  Silver maple gets large, up to 40′ tall and 30′ wide, and the […]

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Mayday

Posted by shane - January 8, 2015 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Trees

Prunus padus var. cummutata Mayday is extremely common and, not surprisingly, of the of species we prune most frequently.  They are a nice medium-sized shade tree that offers an excellent, scented flower display in Spring.  They are very hardy, and although prone to infection by black knot disease, can still grow vigourously even if heavily […]

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Muckle Plum

Posted by shane - January 7, 2015 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Trees

Prunus nigrella ‘Muckle’ Muckle plums are rare in the landscape, which is too bad, because their flower display is among the best of the ornamental trees on the Prairies. This small tree is extremely useful as a specimen in a small yard, near a patio or deck, or planted next to a water feature.  We […]

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Purple-leaf Sandcherry

Posted by shane - January 7, 2015 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Shrubs

Prunus x cistena This is one of the most commonly planted shrubs in Alberta.  It is used for its nice-looking maroon-coloured foliage, but it is one of the least hardy shrubs you can plant in our region.  It frequently dies back hard over winter, and doesn’t start looking “good” again until mid-summer.  We don’t use this […]

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Lodgepole Pine

Posted by shane - January 7, 2015 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Trees

Pinus contorta subsp. latifolia  Lodgepole pine is among my favourite trees, mainly because I grew up among them as a kid in the woods of Northern BC.  My parents both worked for the Forest Service and I spent a lot of time wandering around log yards as a preschooler.  The smell of fresh pine sap […]

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Linden

Posted by shane - January 7, 2015 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Trees

Tilia flavescens ‘Dropmore’ Tilia americana (Basswood) Tilia cordata (Little leaf linden) Tilia x mongolica ‘Harvest Gold’ Lindens are underutilized in Alberta, and I probably prune no nore than 1-2 specimens per year.  They have nice heart-shaped leaves, fragrant flowers, and a natural pyramidal shape.  They are relatively low-maintenance trees and after formative training need only […]

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Common Lilac

Posted by shane - January 7, 2015 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Shrubs

Syringa vulgaris This is one of my favourite shrubs, despite its propensity for suckering and potential for high-maintenance. Common lilacs are ubiquitous, rock-solid hardy, insect and disease resistant, supremely drought-tolerant, and essentially bomb-proof.  Actually, if someone let off some explosives on a lilac, I’m sure it would happily “sucker back” the next year and create […]

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Laurel-leaf Willow

Posted by shane - January 7, 2015 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Trees

Salix pentandra Laurel leaf willow is an excellent large shade tree most suitable for large spaces such as acreages, parks, and very large back yards.  It is disease and insect resistant, and tolerates drought very well.  As with other willows, laurel leaf is a messy tree, shedding small twigs in branches regularly on windy days. […]

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