Archive: January, 2011

Cottony Ash Psyllid

Posted by shane - January 31, 2011 - Insect Pests, Insects, Diseases & Other Problems

For information on the biology and control of this pest, please refer to the following link to the City of Red Deer Fact Sheet: http://www.reddeer.ca/NR/rdonlyres/B8D5D6D6-6F39-4F6B-A98D-BFBB419AFB17/0/Feb2008CottonyPsyllidhandoutRPC.pdf Red Deer Experience This pest has been tough to control.  Most Black and Manchurian Ash in Red Deer in 2009 were in decline or nearly dead.  In 2010, likely due to a […]

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Shane’s 10 Favourite Trees for Red Deer

Posted by shane - January 31, 2011 - Trees

  Not all trees species are created equally when it comes to Red Deer weather and growing conditions.  The following is a list of my favourites.  They are tough, hardy, insect and disease resistant, and great trees to have in the landscape.  And while I can’t guarantee these will grow well for you, they represent […]

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Birch Leafminer

Posted by shane - January 25, 2011 - Insect Pests, Insects, Diseases & Other Problems

This is a very common pest in the urban landscape in some areas.  In the summer of 2009, there was a serious epidemic in some Red Deer neighbourhoods, but populations declined greatly in 2010, most likely due to a cold, wet spring, and generally cool summer.  As of 2016, leafminer has become an increasing problem […]

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Fire Blight

Posted by shane - January 25, 2011 - Diseases, Insects, Diseases & Other Problems

Fire blight is very common on the Prairies.  Some years are worse than others.  In Calgary and Red Deer, in 2009, it was particularly severe.  Epidemics occur during warm, humid weather, with relative humidity above 60%.  The bacteria responsible for the disease can multiply at temperatures between 15-32C, but do so most readily between 27-29C.  Outbreaks can follow severe storms, […]

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Black Knot Fungus

Posted by shane - January 25, 2011 - Diseases, Insects, Diseases & Other Problems

 Black knot is one of the most commonly encountered diseases among ornamental plantings.  I see it most often on mayday and ‘Schubert’ chokecherry trees.  Besides poor planting techniques and poor plant quality, black knot is the most common cause of plant death among those species. Easily recognizable, black knot starts as swellings on the twigs in […]

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Currants

Posted by shane - January 20, 2011 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Fruiting Shrubs

Currants are quickly becoming some of my favourite shrubs.  They are interesting to prune and its even more fun to watch the results:  big, juicy fruit. I always look forward to making fresh red currant vinaigrette for my garden-fresh spinach and lettuce.  In addition to their usefulness as a food, I appreciate the various currants […]

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Cranberry (Viburnum edule & V. opulus)

Posted by shane - January 20, 2011 - A-Z Plant Maintenance, Fruiting Shrubs

I remember the smell of ripe cranberries as I walked through the woods as a kid. We used to eat the frozen berries that clung to frosty branches all winter.  That was American low-bush cranberry, Viburnum edule, which is only rarely seen in ornamental gardens. American high-bush cranberry and European cranberry, as well as their […]

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Structural Pruning

Posted by shane - January 19, 2011 - Pruning Techniques

Trees are best pruned for structure when young, as early as a season after planting.  By the time I am normally called to a property to assess the trees for health and safety, the trees are either mature, or very nearly so.  As a result, drastic steps to improve the structure of the tree are […]

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Major Deadwood Removal

Posted by shane - January 19, 2011 - Pruning Techniques

Major deadwood refers to branches that are 1/4″ (dime-sized) or more in diameter, unless specified.  Occasionally, depending on the situation, I may consider major deadwood to be 1/2″ or greater.  I generally reserve this technique for larger trees, those that I will be climbing with a rope and harness.  Unless there is a specific disease […]

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Fine Deadwood Removal

Posted by shane - January 19, 2011 - Pruning Techniques

Fine deadwood refers to all dead branches and twigs with a diameter less than 1/4″ in diameter.  Removing dead branches of that diameter is useful when a perfectly clean appearance is necessary, or when the incidence of disease in a particular species warrants such sanitary practices. Fine “dead-wooding” is very common technique to enhance the appearance […]

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